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Two Treatises of Government and a Letter Concerning Toleration
by Locke, John

Overview -
Three of John Locke's finest works, which expound political and religious ideas revolutionary in their time, are presented together in this printing.

When Dutch monarch William of Orange ascended to the English throne in the Glorious Revolution of 1688, burning questions over the best form of governance for England were prominent among the intelligentsia of the era. It was a time when England grappled with incremental transition from monarchy to early forms of democracy and voting, where dynastic monarchy and religious theory still held power over the formation of the state and laws. In this changing climate, John Locke published his works.

In the first treatise of government Locke proceeds to attack and dissect his prominent contemporary Robert Filmer, who was broadly in favour of absolute monarchy under the principle of divine right. The allusions to the Biblical Adam, wherein the monarch can be intimated as a continuation of the first man ever created, are debunked by Locke who asserts that God never asserted that one man had province to rule over all other human beings. Supporting his argument with known history, Locke concludes that no king over the centuries had asserted to be the heir of Adam and thereby the rightful ruler of a country.

In the second treatise Locke turns to a different topic - the state of nature. He discusses how humanity behaved prior to the establishment of formal societies, and concludes that man - even without established government in place - had never been truly lawless even when freedom was at its farthest extent. Arguing against a tyranny of absolute monarchy, and acknowledging the advantages of humanity's freedom in its natural ungoverned state, Locke arrives at his conclusion: a democratically elected government, where humans are accorded freedoms but must conform to the rule of law, is the most advantageous type of government.

A Letter Concerning Toleration was composed by Locke in response to fears that Catholicism was resurgent in England. As an alternative, Locke proposes that the government practice toleration of all Christian creeds, noting that the more diverse the society the less fractious it will be. Examining history, Locke illustrates that denominations gain converts not through violence, but through persuasive discussion.

Lauded as monumental in political philosophy, John Locke's writings are a common requirement in educational courses concerning political science and philosophy to this day. While steeped in the historical realities of the late 17th century, the arguments Locke composes for a governance favorable to the people and their country's development were immensely influential on political theory during and after the Enlightenment era.

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Midtown Scholar Bookstore
Harrisburg, PA, USA

Two Treatises of Government and a Letter Concerning TolerationTwo Treatises of Government and a Letter Concerning Toleration (Paperback)
Pub. Date: 2003
Publisher: Yale University Press
Price: $3.35
Seller: Midtown Scholar Bookstore, Harrisburg, PA, USA
Description: G-Bumped and creased book with tears to the extremities, but not affecting the text block, may have remainder mark or previous owner's name-GOOD Standard-sized.
Two Treatises of Government and a Letter Concerning TolerationTwo Treatises of Government and a Letter Concerning Toleration (Trade paperback)
Pub. Date: 2003
Publisher: Yale University Press
Price: $7.49
Seller: Wonder Book - Member ABAA/ILAB, Frederick, MD, USA
Condition: Good
Notes: Good condition. A copy that has been read but remains intact. May contain markings such as bookplates, stamps, limited notes and highlighting, or a few light stains.
 
 
 
 

More About Two Treatises of Government and a Letter Concerning Toleration by Locke, John
 
 
 
Overview

Three of John Locke's finest works, which expound political and religious ideas revolutionary in their time, are presented together in this printing.

When Dutch monarch William of Orange ascended to the English throne in the Glorious Revolution of 1688, burning questions over the best form of governance for England were prominent among the intelligentsia of the era. It was a time when England grappled with incremental transition from monarchy to early forms of democracy and voting, where dynastic monarchy and religious theory still held power over the formation of the state and laws. In this changing climate, John Locke published his works.

In the first treatise of government Locke proceeds to attack and dissect his prominent contemporary Robert Filmer, who was broadly in favour of absolute monarchy under the principle of divine right. The allusions to the Biblical Adam, wherein the monarch can be intimated as a continuation of the first man ever created, are debunked by Locke who asserts that God never asserted that one man had province to rule over all other human beings. Supporting his argument with known history, Locke concludes that no king over the centuries had asserted to be the heir of Adam and thereby the rightful ruler of a country.

In the second treatise Locke turns to a different topic - the state of nature. He discusses how humanity behaved prior to the establishment of formal societies, and concludes that man - even without established government in place - had never been truly lawless even when freedom was at its farthest extent. Arguing against a tyranny of absolute monarchy, and acknowledging the advantages of humanity's freedom in its natural ungoverned state, Locke arrives at his conclusion: a democratically elected government, where humans are accorded freedoms but must conform to the rule of law, is the most advantageous type of government.

A Letter Concerning Toleration was composed by Locke in response to fears that Catholicism was resurgent in England. As an alternative, Locke proposes that the government practice toleration of all Christian creeds, noting that the more diverse the society the less fractious it will be. Examining history, Locke illustrates that denominations gain converts not through violence, but through persuasive discussion.

Lauded as monumental in political philosophy, John Locke's writings are a common requirement in educational courses concerning political science and philosophy to this day. While steeped in the historical realities of the late 17th century, the arguments Locke composes for a governance favorable to the people and their country's development were immensely influential on political theory during and after the Enlightenment era.

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Details
  • PID: 16837089753
  • ISBN-13: 9780300100181
  • Publisher: Yale University Press
  • Seller: Midtown Scholar Bookstore
    Description: VG-Crisp, clean, unread book with some shelfwear/edgewear, may have a remainder mark-NICE Standard-sized.
    Condition: Very good