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The Supreme Court and the Idea of Progress
by Bickel, Alexander M.

Overview -
Timeless questions about the role of the Supreme Court in the American political and legal system are raised in the late Alexander Bickel's characteristically astute analysis of the work of the Warren Court. He takes issue with the Court's view that its role should be to move the American polity in the direction of perfect equality and expresses his preference for "a more faithful adherence to the method of analytical reason, and a less confident reliance on the intuitive capacity to identify the course of progress."

First published in 1970, this book made news with its prediction that the Court's best-known decision, in Brown v. Board of Education, might be headed for "irrelevance." Bickel charged the Court, particularly in its segregation and reapportionment cases, with being irrational, inconsistent, and even incoherent and argued that its decisions would lead to unwise centralization of government. He explored the limitations on the role of the court in stimulating social progress and concluded that the Warren Court had intervened in matters of social policy where the political process, not judicial action, should apply.

"Process is what especially concerned him - the relationship between the legal and the political process in a country where the two are uniquely intermixed. If he criticized something done by the courts for the stated purpose of speeding school desegregation, that did not mean that he favored state-imposed racial discrimination; in fact he abhorred it. He was concerned, rather, about trying to solve complicated problems by legal formulas instead of leaving them to the give-and-take of the political process."
-- Anthony Lewis

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Wonder Book - Member ABAA/ILAB
Frederick, MD, USA

The Supreme Court and the Idea of ProgressThe Supreme Court and the Idea of Progress
Price: $9.99
Seller: Wonder Book - Member ABAA/ILAB, Frederick, MD, USA
Condition: Acceptable
Notes: First edition copy. Collectible-Acceptable. Good dust jacket. Writing inside.
The Supreme Court and the Idea of ProgressThe Supreme Court and the Idea of Progress (Hardcover)
Pub. Date: 1970-01-01
Publisher: HarperCollins
Price: $14.00
Seller: Ed's Editions, LLC, Columbia, SC, USA
Condition: Good
Notes: First Edition stated, red cloth boards with no dust jacket, clean, has a good tight binding, no marks or notations, light fading of color to spine.
 
 
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    The Supreme Court and the Idea of Progress (Hardcover)
    Pub. Date: 1970
    Publisher: HarperCollins
    Notes: 1970 Harper, hardcover. Jacket has mild wear, binding solid, pages have some tanning, flyleaf has ex-owner inscription, text has few markings, a good copy. We take great pride in accurately describing the condition of our books and media, ship within 48 hours, and offer a 100% money back guarantee. Customers purchasing more than one item from us may be entitled to a shipping discount.

    Best and Fastest Books
    Wantage, NJ, USA
    $15.45
    The Supreme Court and the Idea of Progress (Hardcover)
    Pub. Date: 1970
    Publisher: HarperCollins
    Description: 1970 HarperCollins hardcover, edgeworn dj, a few pen marks in pages, name stamp front, with some shelfwear/edgewear, GOOD Standard-sized.

    Midtown Scholar Bookstore
    Harrisburg, PA, USA
    $19.48
 
 

More About The Supreme Court and the Idea of Progress by Bickel, Alexander M.
 
 
 
Overview

Timeless questions about the role of the Supreme Court in the American political and legal system are raised in the late Alexander Bickel's characteristically astute analysis of the work of the Warren Court. He takes issue with the Court's view that its role should be to move the American polity in the direction of perfect equality and expresses his preference for "a more faithful adherence to the method of analytical reason, and a less confident reliance on the intuitive capacity to identify the course of progress."

First published in 1970, this book made news with its prediction that the Court's best-known decision, in Brown v. Board of Education, might be headed for "irrelevance." Bickel charged the Court, particularly in its segregation and reapportionment cases, with being irrational, inconsistent, and even incoherent and argued that its decisions would lead to unwise centralization of government. He explored the limitations on the role of the court in stimulating social progress and concluded that the Warren Court had intervened in matters of social policy where the political process, not judicial action, should apply.

"Process is what especially concerned him - the relationship between the legal and the political process in a country where the two are uniquely intermixed. If he criticized something done by the courts for the stated purpose of speeding school desegregation, that did not mean that he favored state-imposed racial discrimination; in fact he abhorred it. He was concerned, rather, about trying to solve complicated problems by legal formulas instead of leaving them to the give-and-take of the political process."
-- Anthony Lewis

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Details
  • PID: 16314620014
  • ISBN-13: 9780060103187
  • Seller: Wonder Book - Member ABAA/ILAB
    Condition: Very Good
    Notes: First edition copy. Collectible-Very Good. Good dust jacket. (warren court)