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A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening : Adapted to North America
by Downing, Andrew Jackson

Overview -
This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1850 edition. Excerpt: ...of Athol, who afterwards, struck by the rapidity of their growth and the excellency of their timber, planted thousands of acres with them. As a specimen of what is done in timber growing abroad, and the peculiar capacity of the Larch for thriving on poor soils, we shall make some extracts from the account given of its growth in Scotland, by Sir T. D. Lauder. Newton's Vitruvius, p. 4u. The late Duke of Athol planted large districts with this tree, and thereby converted the heathy wastes into valuable forests; but this was not the whole of the improvement he thus created. The Larch being a deciduous tree, sheds upon the earth so great a shower of decayed spines every succeeding autumn, that the annual addition which is made to the soil cannot be less than from a third of an inch to half an inch, according to the magnitude of the trees. This we have had opportunities of proving by our remarks made on the surfaces of newly cleaned pleasure walks. The result of planting a moor with Larches then, is, that when the trees have grown so much as to exclude the air and moisture from the surface, the heath is soon exterminated; and the soil gradually increasing by the decomposition of the leaflets annually thrown down by the Larches, grass begins to grow as the trees rise in elevation, so as to allow greater freedom for the circulation of the air below, --and thus, land which was not worth one shilling an acre becomes most valuable pasture; and we can say that our own experience amply bears out the fact. The Duke of Athol found that the value of the pasture in oak copses was worth five or six shillings (sterling) per acre for eight years only in twenty-four, when the copse is cut down again. Under a Scotch fir plantation it is not worth sixpence more...

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More About A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening by Downing, Andrew Jackson
 
 
 
Overview

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1850 edition. Excerpt: ...of Athol, who afterwards, struck by the rapidity of their growth and the excellency of their timber, planted thousands of acres with them. As a specimen of what is done in timber growing abroad, and the peculiar capacity of the Larch for thriving on poor soils, we shall make some extracts from the account given of its growth in Scotland, by Sir T. D. Lauder. Newton's Vitruvius, p. 4u. The late Duke of Athol planted large districts with this tree, and thereby converted the heathy wastes into valuable forests; but this was not the whole of the improvement he thus created. The Larch being a deciduous tree, sheds upon the earth so great a shower of decayed spines every succeeding autumn, that the annual addition which is made to the soil cannot be less than from a third of an inch to half an inch, according to the magnitude of the trees. This we have had opportunities of proving by our remarks made on the surfaces of newly cleaned pleasure walks. The result of planting a moor with Larches then, is, that when the trees have grown so much as to exclude the air and moisture from the surface, the heath is soon exterminated; and the soil gradually increasing by the decomposition of the leaflets annually thrown down by the Larches, grass begins to grow as the trees rise in elevation, so as to allow greater freedom for the circulation of the air below, --and thus, land which was not worth one shilling an acre becomes most valuable pasture; and we can say that our own experience amply bears out the fact. The Duke of Athol found that the value of the pasture in oak copses was worth five or six shillings (sterling) per acre for eight years only in twenty-four, when the copse is cut down again. Under a Scotch fir plantation it is not worth sixpence more...

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Details
  • PID: 15016576458
  • ISBN-13: 9780341895763
  • Publisher: Franklin Classics
  • Seller: Alibris
    Condition: New.
    Notes: Sewn binding. Cloth over boards. 652 p. Contains: Illustrations, black & white.