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The Agrarian Problem in the Sixteenth Century 1912 [Hardcover]
by R.H. Tawney

Overview -
This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1912 Excerpt: ...(b) manors in Wiltshire and Dorsetshire (one), and (c) manors in other southern and eastern counties, but including one in Staffordshire and one in Lancashire. For purposes of comparison the table given in Part I. Chapter Ill., illustrating the use made of the customary holdings, is repeated here: --1 Leadam, Domesday of enclosures). For a discussion as to whether they suggest that enclosing took place for arable or pasture, see Trans. Royal Hist. Soc., New Series, vol. xiv. Quarterly Journal of Economics, vol. xi. Table X 1 Oxford Studies in Social and Legal History, vol. i. pp. 171-173. P II (continued) Composed Of (a) Thibtt-two Farms On Twenty-three Manors In Wilts And One Manor In Dorset The figures in this table do not pretend to complete accuracy, but their classification of the distribution of land between different uses is not far wrong. Of the customary tenants' land about 87 per cent, is arable, and 12 per cent. meadow and pasture. Of the farmers' land about 49 per cent, is arable, 36 per cent, pasture, 9 per cent, meadow. The proportion of pasture to arable is somewhat higher in the southern and midland counties than it is in East Anglia; but the cases examined are too few to allow of any conclusion being drawn from this fact. Without pushing the figures in either table further than they will go, one may suggest that they seem to imply, in the first place, that thelarge farmer was by no means always a grazier, and that the writers of the period who spoke as though all large-scale farming meant the conversion of arable to pasture were 'guilty of some exaggeration. In a good many cases the methods of cultivation pursued by the farmer of the demesne differed from those of the customary tenants only in the fact that his holding was larger; as a matte..

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More About The Agrarian Problem in the Sixteenth Century 1912 [Hardcover] by R.H. Tawney
 
 
 
Overview

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1912 Excerpt: ...(b) manors in Wiltshire and Dorsetshire (one), and (c) manors in other southern and eastern counties, but including one in Staffordshire and one in Lancashire. For purposes of comparison the table given in Part I. Chapter Ill., illustrating the use made of the customary holdings, is repeated here: --1 Leadam, Domesday of enclosures). For a discussion as to whether they suggest that enclosing took place for arable or pasture, see Trans. Royal Hist. Soc., New Series, vol. xiv. Quarterly Journal of Economics, vol. xi. Table X 1 Oxford Studies in Social and Legal History, vol. i. pp. 171-173. P II (continued) Composed Of (a) Thibtt-two Farms On Twenty-three Manors In Wilts And One Manor In Dorset The figures in this table do not pretend to complete accuracy, but their classification of the distribution of land between different uses is not far wrong. Of the customary tenants' land about 87 per cent, is arable, and 12 per cent. meadow and pasture. Of the farmers' land about 49 per cent, is arable, 36 per cent, pasture, 9 per cent, meadow. The proportion of pasture to arable is somewhat higher in the southern and midland counties than it is in East Anglia; but the cases examined are too few to allow of any conclusion being drawn from this fact. Without pushing the figures in either table further than they will go, one may suggest that they seem to imply, in the first place, that thelarge farmer was by no means always a grazier, and that the writers of the period who spoke as though all large-scale farming meant the conversion of arable to pasture were 'guilty of some exaggeration. In a good many cases the methods of cultivation pursued by the farmer of the demesne differed from those of the customary tenants only in the fact that his holding was larger; as a matte..

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Details
  • PID: 14720539845
  • Publisher: Facsimile Publisher
  • Seller: Rare Reprints
    Condition: New in New jacket
    Notes: Lang: -English, Pages 480. It is the reprint edition of the original edition which was published long back (1912). The book is printed in black on high quality paper with Matt Laminated colored dust cover. We found this book important for the readers who want to know more about our old treasure so we brought it back to the shelves. We tried to manage the best possible copy but in some cases, there may be some pages which are blur or missing or with black spots. We expect that you will understand our compulsion in these books. Print on Demand.