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Autobiography and Memoirs Volume 2
by Argyll, George Douglas Campbell Duke of (Creator)

Overview -
This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1906 Excerpt: ...and for not punishing the responsible agents.' After the meeting, the Duke wrote to Lord Granville (September 20, 1876): 'The meeting was the most formidable I ever addressed. More than 3,300 people, all men--I don't think there were ten women in the whole hall--largely working men. The row was tremendous from the pressure and discomfort, the crowd swaying to and fro in a frightful way under the distant gallery. 'After a few sentences I caught the ear of the meeting, and spoke for one hour and a half, having to curtail in several points what I intended. They listened attentively to the last.' This speech produced a great effect, not merely on the audience, but throughout the country, and the Duke received numerous appreciative letters, both from friends and strangers. From these, the following extracts are quoted: From Lord Granville Walmer Castle, September 24th, 1876). 'I am very glad you are going to publish your magnificent speech. 'Great as is my admiration for the hostile sex, men are, after all, the best audience. They cheer, which women and Peers do not. 'What is to be the upshot? I presume not an autumn session. The fact of Hartington and Gladstone having proposed it makes it more unlikely, and I do not see on what grounds the Government would summon Parliament.... We must propose a vote of censure of some sort or other, which would be defeated in both Houses by large majorities.' From Lord Playfair September 22nd, 1876). 'Since the Eastern Question rose in prominence I have been travelling in Brittany, and have read with much interest all the speeches in regard to it; but none have gone to my heart and understanding so much as your Grace's speech at Glasgow, and I am sure you will allow me to say so to yourself. 'Your speech was not declamation, b...

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More About Autobiography and Memoirs Volume 2 by Argyll, George Douglas Campbell Duke of (Creator)
 
 
 
Overview

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1906 Excerpt: ...and for not punishing the responsible agents.' After the meeting, the Duke wrote to Lord Granville (September 20, 1876): 'The meeting was the most formidable I ever addressed. More than 3,300 people, all men--I don't think there were ten women in the whole hall--largely working men. The row was tremendous from the pressure and discomfort, the crowd swaying to and fro in a frightful way under the distant gallery. 'After a few sentences I caught the ear of the meeting, and spoke for one hour and a half, having to curtail in several points what I intended. They listened attentively to the last.' This speech produced a great effect, not merely on the audience, but throughout the country, and the Duke received numerous appreciative letters, both from friends and strangers. From these, the following extracts are quoted: From Lord Granville Walmer Castle, September 24th, 1876). 'I am very glad you are going to publish your magnificent speech. 'Great as is my admiration for the hostile sex, men are, after all, the best audience. They cheer, which women and Peers do not. 'What is to be the upshot? I presume not an autumn session. The fact of Hartington and Gladstone having proposed it makes it more unlikely, and I do not see on what grounds the Government would summon Parliament.... We must propose a vote of censure of some sort or other, which would be defeated in both Houses by large majorities.' From Lord Playfair September 22nd, 1876). 'Since the Eastern Question rose in prominence I have been travelling in Brittany, and have read with much interest all the speeches in regard to it; but none have gone to my heart and understanding so much as your Grace's speech at Glasgow, and I am sure you will allow me to say so to yourself. 'Your speech was not declamation, b...

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Details
  • PID: 13201467878
  • ISBN-13: 9781345043419
  • Publisher: Arkose Press
  • Seller: Alibris
    Condition: New.
    Notes: Sewn binding. Cloth over boards. 662 p. Contains: Illustrations, black & white.